DxO Marks Published for the Nikon D600

The team at DxO (who measure sensor performance for cameras across the industry) have published the scores for the Nikon D600, and the results look pretty darn good!  (they use the term “enthusiast photographer(s)” many times during their writeup, which I thought was kind of fun, too…  :))  Before we get to the benchmarks, you might want to see my post “Should I get a new camera?”.

The overall DxO score of the D600 was 94, just one point behind the $2999 D800 and two behind the $3299 D800e.  Pretty amazing.  Even more incredible is comparing the $2100 D600 to the former-flagship Nikon D3X that lists for $7,999.  The D3x scores only an 88 and is bested in every category.  Of course, the D3x was no low-ISO king, so what about the other flagship, the king-of-the-night D3s?  82 vs. 94.  The D600 doesn’t measure up to the D3s in terms of ISO performance, but crushes the D3s in dynamic range and color to claim the crown.  Even the much-loved, former entry-FX Nikon D700  scores an 80.  Wow.  If you’re a Canon shooter, the news is even worse.  While they don’t have a new 6D to test, the current 5DMkIII priced at $3464 scores only 81 and we have little reason to think that Canon would embarrass the fairly-new 5DMkIII with a 6D.

One Important Note: These numbers aren’t the only measure of a camera by any stretch.  In fact, I’d take the position they are very often used to place too much emphasis on the sensor when you really have to look at the entire system and make decisions based on handling, autofocus performance, lens compatibility, weather-sealing and other factors  Iif you’re a regular reader, you know I hate the technology bullies who say you must have the latest sensor.  I chose the D300s with pro handling and AF over the newer D7000 with the better sensor but prosumer AF and handling – I couldn’t be happier.  For the record, the D600 has the same handling and (essentially) AF as the D7000.  That is a good thing for a whole lot of people, just not my personal preference.  I happily shot my similar-handling D70/D90 for years, though, so I’m not saying the D600 doesn’t handle very well – it handles great.  It just doesn’t handle like the pro-handling D300s/D700/D800 – it is a tow-MAY-tow, tow-MAH-tow kind of thing.

The Bottom Line:  These numbers absolutely say that the D600 represents an amazing value.  Nikon is hitting the ball pretty hard these days.  The price of FX isn’t for everyone, but this camera sure lowers the cost of entry.  If you’re a Nikon-shooting Enthusiast Photographer, this gives you a terrific price point for an easy-shooting camera with great durability and stunning performance.

You can check out the full DxO write-up by clicking here.

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…and the Saga of the D600 Continues…

If you’ve found your way here via a search engine, the Nikon D600 has now announced.  Check out my take on it here.

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The internet (at least the Nikon area of it) is abuzz again today with updated rumors of the FX camera said to be a D600.  The biggest piece of news is that the autofocus motor is now rumored to be included, contrary to previous reports. This makes the camera much more attractive to people like me who have older FX lenses like the original Tamron 28-75 and the Nikon 80-200 f/2.8 ED that are manual-focus lenses on a body without a built-in motor like the consumer Nikon D3200 or D5100.

From a glass perspective, this camera still poses an issue.  I have three DX lenses in my kit – the Nikon 35mm f/1.8, the Nikon 18-200 VRII and the Tokina 11-16 f/2.8.  All of these lenses are terrific, and I don’t think I’d sell them to chase the FX-equivalents: the “nifty fifty” 50 f/1.8 and the 28-300.  Honestly, I’m not sure what I’d do for wide on FX – wide is pricey on FX!

I’m still hoping for a true DX-based D300s successor.  As I said before, the camera described at Nikonrumors sounds a lot more like a D8000 than a D400/D600.  Since I have upcoming trips to Asia and Europe looming in the next six weeks, I’ll probably be watching from the sidelines…

Nikon D600: a step closer?

NikonRumors has posted some additional details on what they say are specs for a full-frame (FX), 24 megapixel D600, set to be announced before September. Since I mentioned it as a possible tradeoff I was willing to live with, it is pretty funny to me that the updated information purports the new camera to have a 39-point autofocus system (presumably similar to what is in the D7000), which I mentioned in my D400/D600 post.

If that is true, this really sounds like something other than a camera that would be called a D600. With dual SD card slots, no AF motor, U1/U2 preset modes and the 39-point AF system, this sounds a lot like a four-digit model (D8000?) for consumer/prosumer than a pro model (D400/D600).

As I mentioned in my earlier post, the prices are rumored to be as low as $1500, but I’m thinking that is Euros (around $1900), lower than the current D700 price of $2199, but high enough and with a feature set that won’t drag too much away from the D800 (though the D800 could use a little easing of demand given the massive-if-likely-inflated orders out there…). That price would give them room for a D400, too…

Whatever they call it, I think the D600 will be a big hit. If there is no D400, I can only hope it pushes used prices down on the D300s and D700, because it won’t be a camera for me – I’m too invested in lenses that require a screw-drive to change now…

What do you think? Is a D600 the right camera for you?

What really replaces the D300s?

If you’re a Nikon guy (or gal – I’m a Nikon guy), you’ve done a lot of wondering lately.  How is Nikon recovering from the disasters in Japan and Thailand? When will the D800 and D4 come out?  What is going to happen with the D700?  When will Nikon meet the demand on these products.

We’ve got some level of answers on several of these questions, but not all of them, and we have others.  For example, what replaces the D300s and when does that happen?  And in some cases the answers we got generated new questions.  Specifically, I’m referring to Nikon declaring that the D800 wasn’t a replacement for the D700, but a “whole new class of product.”  That may just be marketing hyperbole.  It might also you insight to where Nikon is going.

Rumors have been out there about a D400 for a while, and when the D3200 came out, lots of folks declared this 24MP sensor with the pro-build around it was the underpinnings of the replacement for the D300s.  Logical enough.  I posted my D400 wishes here earlier, and it remains one of my most popular posts (at least in terms of hit-count).

But what if Nikon really wants to shake things up?  What if they define a product that replaces both the D300s and the D700?  What if they created an entry full-frame camera at 24MP that had a 12MP DX mode complete with the same viewfinder shroud I understand  is featured in the D700/D3 (that makes what you see in the viewfinder the DX image you’ll get instead of relying on lighted borders or guessing)?  What if they put that product out at $1699 or even as low as $1500 and called it a D600?

Rumors about a Nikon D600 have been popping up on websites that range from lightly trustworthy (Nikonrumors) to very trustworthy (CNET) over the last two weeks, and appear to be gaining momentum.  In general, I like the sound of it.  It means like Nikon is looking forward, not back – Looking to pressure the competition, not protect generations-old product categories.

There is one detail that disturbs me about all this talk: The rumors also say the body wouldn’t have a built-in motor, similar to the entry DX bodies like the D3200/D5100.  That would leave my beloved Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 and Nikon 80-20 f/2.8 out in the cold, and I can’t have that.  My guess is the ability to meter with manual-focus glass and possibly fine-tune lenses would also be left out of this crippled entry offering.  All three of those things make it a non-starter for me.

Part of the bargain of a D700 (or the replacement I described) for me would be that my two best lenses would still work and work well.  These are both terrific lenses that are (relatively) affordable by the Enthusiast Photographer.  If the D600 won’t focus these lenses, it isn’t the camera for me. 😦

It isn’t that I’m against creating limitations to create separation across product lines.  Heck, I’d put the D7000 autofocus system (39 points vs. the 51 of the D300s, D700 and the newer/bigger Pro bodies) and lose a few other features to keep the screw-drive in a D600 along with the other tools that let me use some of the best and most affordable lenses out there.

Ultimately, Nikon is going to do what they think they have to do drive sales and get ahead in the market.  Much like BMW, one of my other favorite brands, it may cost them to future loyalty and sales of the old-school folks who care more about photos and less about video, who want to have strong core features and are less worried about frills.

As right as the D600 probably is for Nikon’s balance sheet, it leaves me out of the equation unless a D400 also appears.  I don’t see how that can happen based on the price point of the D700 and the rumored price point of the D600.  Even if the D7000 drops to $999, I can’t see a D600 at even $1599 with a D400 somewhere in the middle.

So I’m rooting for the D600 rumors to be wrong, or even just nothing more than rumors.  And I’m still wondering when we’ll know…