Japan (and Singapore) 2014

My job sometimes takes me to really cool places, and recently I was sent to China, Japan and Singapore. I didn’t get a chance to get out at all in Beijing, but got around a fair bit in Japan. Finished with several days in Singapore, but most of the photography from that leg was pretty touristy, so most of the images below are from Tokyo.  I was in Macau earlier this Summer, but haven’t had a chance to pull those together as I’ve been swapping computers.  I’ll come back to those soon…

In any case, I was apparently in an abstract mood… 🙂

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14573067759_bc953e98d9_cLEE_788214737037866_63cf1d2dfd_bI feel like these images do a better job taking me back to the place and time than “regular” photographs, and I find myself paying a lot more attention to my surroundings and the small details everywhere…  🙂

What is your favorite travel/vacation photo?

 

 

More D400 Rumors

D400An article on Nasim Mansurov’s blog has freshened hopes for a D400 to replace the aging D300s.  Most interestingly, it is the first time I’ve seen something that aligns with my thoughts on why Nikon hasn’t announced it yet.  Net: It was disrupted by all the events in Asia (the tsunami in Japan and especially the floods in Thailand where the is a big DX focus for Nikon).  Plans for a release were allegedly pulled a second time to update the design – once the delay got beyond a certain point, the design was too rooted in the past.  As a guy who has worked in the tech industry in product management, these things ring true to me – time will tell.

A completely new, faster and more capable autofocus system caught my eye in the article.  Of course the camera (if announced) would also have pro-handling features like AF-ON, 10-pin connector and a deep buffer.

Announcement was rumored for September, which might or might not be true.  I wouldn’t at all be surprised to see Nikon wait for 2014 CES to announce it along with the D4s also mentioned in the article (which is also just a rumor).

In the meantime, I’ve really been enjoying my D300s.  The announcement of the D7100 caused me to think about whether that camera would be worth it.  I personally love the handling of the D300s, and have no desire to go the other direction.  Presumably the D400 will closely follow the D800 handling, which prioritized some video features over still photography features in the handling.  I’ve heard mixed reviews, and ultimately I’ll have to see for myself.  I really like how the D300s handles, and I don’t use DSLR video at all.  Handling is personal – what is fine for one person isn’t fine for another, and I’m especially finicky.

I’m looking forward to seeing what gets announced!  In the meantime, I’m out shooting with the terrific camera I already have!

Waiting…for nothing? D400 thoughts

D400The search term “D400” still brings a lot of people to this site.  This puzzles me since I haven’t written a lot about it, especially recently.  I see a lot of (sometimes chippy) dialogue about it on the various forums – did Nikon intend to merge the prosumer (D7000) and semi-pro (D300s) with the D7100?  Is there a market for a D400?  How should it be priced?  What features would it have?  Would a D800 in DX mode be an acceptable substitute?  (as a note, I use the term “semi-pro” as a reference to the build of the camera – full magnesium frame, non-integrated grip, pro-style handling and controls and top-class autofocus.  I don’t mean it as a reference to whether it is used to earn money.  I’d call it a “pro” body, but folks in the industry seem to equate that to a body like the D3/D4 or Canon 1Dx, which have integrated grips)

The price point and features of the D7100 make me think there is still an unfilled slot in the product line, and one Canon hasn’t abandoned (though it will be interesting to see if there is a C7D MkII…).

Thom Hogan and Nasim Mansurov among many others have speculated a bit on the features (Mansurov’s poll was pretty interesting, too).  I think the core elements are:

  • Same 51-point autofocus as the D7100 (CAM 3500DX)
  • Big buffer for the sports and wildlife shooters that love the DX platform
  • 7-9 frames per second (also mainly for the sports/wildlife folks)
  • Same build/controls as the D800 (including the AF ON button so important to the crew above)
  • $1799 price

People who argue that the price is too close to the D600 (at $2099, $1999 street) are missing the point – the D600 has literally none of the features above, and isn’t a suitable camera for the core D300s/semi-pro DX shooters.  Whether there are enough of them out there for Nikon is open for debate.  There are lots of opinions on the internet, but precious little data about volumes.  The D800 is over $1000 more than than we’re talking about and still doesn’t match the 7 to 8 frames per second (FPS) shooting speed of the D300s (the D800 only shoots 5 FPS in DX mode or 6 FPS with a grip attached).

Personally, I think the D400 was impacted by the tsunami disaster in Japan – I believe Nikon had to make a choice about what they could get out the door with limited resources and chose the D800 and D4.  Re-slotting a product isn’t easy – technology development isn’t a flexible process.

So the question is whether they killed the entire product, merged it or it is still in the pipeline, presumably this year or early next.  Personally, I’d love to see Nikon take this opportunity to do something really next-generation and deliver it by or before CES 2014 (which is in January).

Time will tell, and in the meantime, Nikon isn’t saying much.  That might be the biggest clue something is coming…

Scrapyard Visit

I was driving home from an out-of-town work trip the other day and saw an old boneyard with a bunch of cool, rusty old American cars. I turned around and pulled in to look around, and then remembered I had my camera with me. After talking to the guy running the yard and asking if it was cool for me to take some photos, I had a nice time wandering around, looking for texture.

It was actually a lot harder than I expected. Of all the photos I took, only three came out even close to what I was going for:

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Nikon D300s – 35mm f/1.8 @ f/2.5 – 1/40th – ISO 800 – Set for – 1/3 EV

A little thinner on depth-of-field (DOF) than I wanted, but it was pretty dark. Since I was hand-holding and shooting from an awkward angle/position, I had to keep a reasonable shutter speed. Since I thought there would be too much noise if I popped the ISO higher, I went with a wider aperture. In retrospect, a bad choice.  I could have also done myself a favor and not set the exposure for -1/3 EV.  That would have helped, too.

Nikon D300s - 35mm f/1.8 @ f/2.8, 1/8000 - ISO 200

Nikon D300s – 35mm f/1.8 @ f/2.8 – 1/8000 – ISO 200 – Set for -1 EV

Shooting outside in harsh sun, this shot was actually pretty challenging. Even setting the camera for a full stop lower exposure (-1 EV), I still have some blown out spots. The DOF worked better for me here, though, and I’m happier with this shot

Nikon D300s - 35mm f/1.8 @ f/2.8 - 1/3200 - ISO 200 - Set for -1 EV

Nikon D300s – 35mm f/1.8 @ f/2.8 – 1/3200 – ISO 200 – Set for -1 EV

Another shot where I was fighting really harsh sun, I also used the exposure compensation to adjust down a whole stop.  In retrospect, I wish I’d gotten in tighter on the “Special” medallion.  You can faintly see 1957 engraved there, and it would have been a cool shot, and a lot less busy than this one.

A few lessons of the day:

  • Always have your camera with you
  • Don’t forget about the EV/exposure adjustment, but don’t forget when you’ve set it! 🙂
  • Use the screen to zoom in and see if you’re getting what you want.  I usually do it more carefully than I did that day.

Even though I didn’t get all the shots I wanted, I’m so glad I stopped.  It was really cool to see all these old cars, some of which will either be on the road again or help another car get there.  The experience is always good, no matter how the shots turn out!

What kind of problems have YOU had shooting lately?

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Nikon announces D7100

If you haven’t heard yet, this is yet another new camera from Nikon, and it is aimed squarely at Enthusiast Photographers.

Details here: http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Digital-SLR-Cameras/1513/D7100.html

I’m on an airport bus in LA, so more thoughts later :).

Nikon D600 – Full-Frame for the Enthusiast Photographer

The subject of swirling rumors and debates for many months, the worst-kept secret in the photography world finally saw the light of day today: Nikon finally announced the first “prosumer” (my term) full-frame DSLR, the D600.

Before we talk about the specs, lets talk about the price.  Many rumors put it as low as $1500.  I guessed it to be Euros and put it at $1899 or $1999.  All of that was wrong – the price is $2099.  That places it at the same price as the D700 did once the D800 came out, and potentially leaves enough room underneath for a D300s replacement.  On the whole, I think it is a good price but not a great price. An additional $900 gets you to a D800, which will make a lot of people think (personally, I think the D800 is under-priced).

As for specs, they are pretty much what everyone thought:

  • 24.3 Megapixel FX (full frame) sensor, producing images as large as 6,016 x 4,016
  • 5.5 Frames per second
  • ISO 100-6400
  • 39-point autofocus system with 9 cross-type sensors
  • Dual SD slots
  • Built-in screw drive for non-AFS lenses (in other words, lenses that don’t have a built-in motor)
  • U1/U2 user-definable presets like the D7000
  • 3.2″ screen, 921,000-pixel screen
  • 1/4000 maximum shutter speed
  • 1/200 flash sync

Those last two have a lot of people up in arms, and frankly I can’t see why.  This is a camera for the enthusiast.  A body for the serious amateur photographer seeking the low light performance offered by a full-frame sensor.  With ISO 100 and 1/4000, it covers a similar range as the D700 with a base ISO of 200 with a 1/8000 shutter.  Want both ISO 100 and a 1/8000 shutter?  Welcome to the D800.

Ergonomics and autofocus are virtually identical to the D7000, which is a good thing.  I’ve read some reports of the D7000 not working well with superzooms (think 600mm prime lenses as long as your arm), but I don’t see why people who own one of those lenses are going to shoot a D600.  All the lenses the target customers will want to use will work perfectly on the D600.  Ergonomics are classic Nikon, which is a good thing.  Personally, I much prefer the handling of my D300s over the D7000, but it offers a great combination for the novice and advanced shooter.

Since we don’t have comparisons, ISO performance and other figures, it is hard to compare the D600 to anything and come to a full conclusion.  But it is probably very good. Nikon hasn’t laid an egg in a long time (I don’t count the D800 focus issues, since that is a quality control escape, not a product design issue), and this is a new category for them: They’ll hit the ball pretty hard and it will be a winner.

Should you buy one?  Harder to say.  It isn’t cheap.  You only get partial function from your DX lenses if you have any (there is a DX-mode that lets you shoot DX lenses, but I’d like to see it in use before I say that is something you’d live with happily…).  If you don’t have any lenses, your bill for FX glass is generally going to be higher than DX.  At 24MP, your holding technique had better be pretty good or it is going to show up big-time in your photos.  24MP is going to mean bigger cards, more hard drive space and chew up some performance on your PC.

Low-light performance should be strong, and a well-executed image is likely to be very, very good.

If the money isn’t a big deal, I’d say you can’t go wrong.  FX at this price point is a bargain, and you’ll get plenty of help from the camera to get great images.  But like my last post, I don’t ever want to have a great camera and poor lenses.  Being glass-poor is going to make any camera look bad.  Great glass is going to give you wonderful results even from a limited camera.

You might have noticed I haven’t mentioned video.  Call me a curmudgeon, but I have no desire for video on my DSLR, and frankly I don’t know enough about it to offer perspective or opinions.  I’m sure the internet has no lack of those for the video features.

I’m sure a lot of you will be happy owners of a D600, and it is likely to be a big success for Nikon.  As for me, I’m focusing on the equipment I have, and looking at the blank spot in Nikon’s product line where the D300s used to be.  If I was going full-frame, I’d be strongly tempted to pick up a used D700, but I’m a happy DX guy at this point.

Read the official press release, information and see many photos on Nikon’s website.  Also, check out dpreview.com’s preview of the D600 here.

So what do you think about the announcement, the price and the camera?

August Madness or Buck Fever

If you’re hanging around a Nikon photography forum, you’re probably seeing lots of threads about upcoming announcements in August.  A new D4, maybe a D400, possibly even a D800.  All of these are likely to be fantastic cameras, and I’m already noticing a flurry of new “For Sale” ads on the Buy/Sell area of my favorite forum for Nikon D3, D3s and D700 models.  In some cases people explicitly state they are selling in anticipation of Nikon’s August 24th announcement.

I’m anticipating the huge wave of “should I upgrade” threads on the forums.  And while it is a question virtually every Enthusiast Photographer will ask, the answer is really going to be “It depends”.

From a feature perspective, I use Snapsort.com to compare the specs of one camera to another.  It is a pretty handy way to look at what the new things offers, but it isn’t a definitive list.  For example, a key reason you might choose a Nikon D300s over a D7000 would be the much larger buffer for the D300s, allowing Birds-in-Flight (BIF) or sports shooters to shoot continuously for longer – a key spec not represented.  But for most specs it is an extremely useful site.

So as you’re looking at all the things that the new camera will do, ask yourself “Is it worth the money and hassle of switching?”

I’m no different than anyone else – I find myself in serious covet of both the D7000 (D7K) and the D700.  I’ll probably be sorely tempted by the D400 whenever it comes out.  But let’s stay in reality for now.  Of the things I care about, here’s what a D7K gives me over my D90:

  • More autofocus points (39 vs. 11)
  • More cross-type autofocus points (9 vs. 1)
  • True ISO 100 at the bottom and ISO 6400 at the top
  • 1/8000 max shutter speed (vs. 1/4000)
  • More color depth – 70% more colors
  • Will meter with manual lenses
  • An intervalometer (allows for timed pictures – e.g. a shot every minute for a certain amount of time)
  • Two SD slots – one can back up the other, or use it for overflow
  • Weather sealing

So that is a lot of features, right?  I’m not even mentioning the higher resolution (which is a post for another day…), the video features or the range of other upgrades over the D90.      I surely could have used 1/8000 on my recent trip to the beach.  More colors is always nice.  I’d always prefer better autofocus and manual lenses fascinate me for their bang-for-the-buck prowess and the challenge they represent.  A better ISO 3200 and a native ISO 100 would be good things.  But for the additional $600 it will cost me to get the D7000, I can be well on my way to some mighty fine glass, or a flash, or a better ball head, or some photography lessons, or…  well, you get the point.

Here’s the net:  Do you really NEED it, or do you just really WANT it?  I’d submit 90% of us (myself included) fall into “want” vs. “need” when it comes to the latest body.  I have to admit my affection for my D90 has grown quite a bit since the recent addition of my Nikon 80-200 f/2.8 ED and the Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 non-BIM.  So boils down to a nearly universal cry in the photography world:  Invest in glass first.  Then invest a good tripod and head, or lessons, or a good book and get the most out of your current camera.  From there, a body isn’t a bad upgrade, but it won’t be too long until the next thing is out…