Japan (and Singapore) 2014

My job sometimes takes me to really cool places, and recently I was sent to China, Japan and Singapore. I didn’t get a chance to get out at all in Beijing, but got around a fair bit in Japan. Finished with several days in Singapore, but most of the photography from that leg was pretty touristy, so most of the images below are from Tokyo.  I was in Macau earlier this Summer, but haven’t had a chance to pull those together as I’ve been swapping computers.  I’ll come back to those soon…

In any case, I was apparently in an abstract mood… 🙂

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14573067759_bc953e98d9_cLEE_788214737037866_63cf1d2dfd_bI feel like these images do a better job taking me back to the place and time than “regular” photographs, and I find myself paying a lot more attention to my surroundings and the small details everywhere…  🙂

What is your favorite travel/vacation photo?

 

 

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That twitch…

WP_20140205_007A yellow field surrounded by mottled gray and bone-white trees and morning mist.  An abandoned church covered in vines, the door blocked by vines but the stained glass that crowns the entrance peeking through.  An old camper wildly painted in vivid colors and images that are slowly fading.  A bright pink diner with a Cadillac out front and a tremendous array of Elvis memorabilia on the walls.  Fields split by a rumbly river fringed with trees.  Stone bridges barely wide enough to pass on four wheels.

An unexpected trip this morning took me on twisty, back-country roads that I thoroughly enjoyed driving.  But as I wound my way to my destination, images kept catching my eyes and making me wish I’d brought my camera.

I’m sitting in the pink diner, and I’ll probably take the chance on the way home to take some of those pictures with my phone.  They won’t be the images I wanted, and mainly I’ll take them to illustrate the path I’ll return to in the near future to capture the images the way I really want to catch them.

I finished 2013 with a bullet.  Lots of travel.  Busy with work and family.  I haven’t even taken the opportunity to post my Favorites of 2013 yet (which I’ll get to shortly).  The shutter-bug in me had been dormant other than family photos recently, but it is now fully awake and pulling me to get out with my camera.  Not a bad way to start 2014…

What I’ve been shooting lately… (Part 1)

It has been an incredible run of travel this year – well over 100,000 miles in the air and over 60,000 since July.  I’ve seen a lot of the inside of a metal tube, but I’ve also had the chance to go to some amazing places.  The more I shoot, the more comfortable I am with my equipment and just as importantly what I need to work on.  So that is the lesson for this post – shoot more and think about what you need to learn to improve when you’re looking at the shots you don’t like as well as then ones you do.

I had my first try at bird-in-flight (BiF) photography.  Verdict:  HARD!  Knowing how to set up my AF was key to getting some decent shots for a first outing.  More knowledge and tuning needed.

I had my first try at bird-in-flight (BiF) photography. Verdict: HARD! Knowing how to set up my AF was key to getting some decent shots for a first outing. More knowledge and tuning needed. D300s & 70-200 f/4 @ f/4, 1/4000, ISO 320, AF-C w/ 51-point tracking

My son came out to feed the gulls. I sat down with my back against the house, and after shooting a few shots with flash I realized I was missing a much better shot without the flash...

My son came out to feed the gulls. I sat down with my back against the house, and after shooting a few shots with flash I realized I was missing a much better shot without the flash… D300s & Nikon 18-200 @ f/7.1, 1/640, ISO 200

I left for Japan the day after returning from the beach.  I took a few photos I like, but I really enjoyed a chance to get a better shot of Tokyo Tower from the Mori Tower.

I left for Japan the day after returning from the beach. I took a few photos I like, but I really enjoyed a chance to get a better shot of Tokyo Tower from the Mori Tower. The conditions were tough again – very windy, but this shot came out OK anyway and really showed the value of VR (vibration reduction). D300s & 70-200 f/4 @ f/4, 1/15, ISO 1000

One of the next places I went was Bangkok.  To say there is a lot of texture there is an understatement.  I'd love to spend a few months wandering around there - amazing, beautiful place.  These fruits were so colorful at a street-side stand, and seemed a perfect time to play nearly wide-open.  D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/2.2, 1/60, ISO 200

One of the next places I went was Bangkok. To say there is a lot of texture there is an understatement. I’d love to spend a few months wandering around there – amazing, beautiful place. These fruits were so colorful at a street-side stand, and seemed a perfect time to play nearly wide-open. D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/2.2, 1/60, ISO 200

The Chao Phraya river in Bankok offers just as much to see as the land.  A good example of the versatility of the 18-200 VRII for both the zoom range and the stabilization.  D300s & 18-200 VRII @ f/7.1, 1/250, ISO 320

The Chao Phraya river in Bankok offers just as much to see as the land. A good example of the versatility of the 18-200 VRII for both the zoom range and the stabilization. D300s & 18-200 VRII @ f/7.1, 1/250, ISO 320

Coming off the river is a combination of a dock and a shopping center, an awesome jam of people and products.  D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.9, 1/160, ISO 800

Coming off the river is a combination of a dock and a shopping center, an awesome jam of people and products. D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.8, 1/160, ISO 800

At the temple of Wat Pho is the Reclining Buddha.  Behind it are metal pots - you make a small donation and get a cup of old coins to plink in the buckets.  The sound as many folks walk up the row is really cool.  Tough to get a sharp shot as it was pretty dark and I didn't want to push the ISO.  D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.8, 1/30, ISO 800

At the temple of Wat Pho is the Reclining Buddha. Behind it are metal pots – you make a small donation and get a cup of old coins to plink in the buckets. The sound as many folks walk up the row is really cool. Tough to get a sharp shot as it was pretty dark and I didn’t want to push the ISO. D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.8, 1/30, ISO 800

An elephant statue at the Erawon Temple in downtown Bangkok.  I should have dialed the ISO down to 200 here -  it was pretty bright. D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.8, 1/1250, ISO 320

An elephant statue at the Erawon Temple in downtown Bangkok. I should have dialed the ISO down to 200 here – it was pretty bright. D300s & 35 f/1.8G @ f/1.8, 1/1250, ISO 320

The Summer kept hopping from there – I took another trip to Asia and went a few other places too. I’ll post a few more photographs from those trips soon. In the meantime, I’d love to see YOUR favorite pix from this year so far!

Updated China and Japan Summer 2012

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As summer approaches, I’m planning another trip to China and Japan. Since my switch to LightRoom 4 over the holidays, I’ve been watching the Lightroom Channel on YouTube, trying to improve my skills.

I thought it would be fun to see what last Summer’s photos could look like. Here are some my favorites. I realize that I didn’t post many photos from my trip to Europe (that started one week after this work trip), so I’ll go do the same thing for those and post them, too.

Like any photography tool, the better you know it, the more effective you can be – Lightroom is no different, though I have to say I’m getting a slow start with it. Guess I need to spend more time with Kelby! 🙂

Seattle Photowalk

Had a bit of fun today on a work trip…a walk before dinner.  My fun favorite?

My favorite, if just because of the perspective.  He was hanging over the front of the ice-bin...

My favorite, if just because of the perspective. He was hanging over the front of the ice-bin…

My real favorite?
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Full set here: http://on.fb.me/11TNZzY

Enthusiast Photographer Photowalk – Charleston, SC

Every year I shoot this boat, but I try to do something different.

Every year I shoot this boat, but I try to do something different.

One of my favorite things to do is walk a city at dawn and shoot photographs.  Each February finds me in Charleston, SC, and I make a point to get out and capture some of the rich texture so richly abundant here.

The harbor boat above is one of my favorite subjects.  One could say I should find something different, and next year I probably will, but I always enjoy this shot.  It isn’t the most accessible place to get a good composition, but the boat and the dawn sky are great.

Some advice for photowalks.

  • Look for texture and detail.
  • Scout the area beforehand if you can.  Wandering around the day before can give you an idea of where you want to be and where you want to go, and save valuable time while the light is changing.
  • Check your equipment the night before.  Make sure you have a extra batteries and cards, format your cards and make sure to either reset your camera or go through it to make sure there aren’t any settings that will interfere with your shooting (ISO, custom white balance, etc.).
  • Pack light.  If you’ve been able to scout, you probably have a good idea of what lenses to take, etc.  The bag can get heavy fast…
  • Respect “No Trespassing” signs and private property.  Not only is it polite, but failing to do so might lead to some sticky situations with the police or worse.  There’s always something else to shoot.
  • Trust your eye – if you see something interesting, figure out why it caught your attention and try to strip your shot down to that.  Composition is one of my big struggles, but I always have fun with it.
  • Look for the unexpected places.  While I always like to have the photo of the landmark I took myself, try to get an unconventional perspective/composition, and always look for the things other people are missing.

Here are a few other shots from this morning (fairly quickly edited from JPEGS – I’ll play with the RAW files when I get home…):

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I had a lot of fun, and found some new and interesting places my trusting my instinct to turn a corner and see what was there.  If you’ve got some photowalk photos, post a link in the comment area!  Constructive feedback is always welcome, too!

Touristy Photos

I wanted to briefly share a simple contrast between a “snapshot” and a “photograph”.  So often you hear about people coming back from exotic places with a lot of boring photos that just don’t make anyone happy – they don’t excite the people who look at them and they seem only a vague shadow of something amazing to the person who took the photo hoping to catch a sliver.

I did a lot of traveling around the world recently, and my renewed dedication to photography gave me the chance to see different photographic opportunities than I did just a few years ago.  I wanted to come back with as few snapshots as possible, and I wanted my images to mean something to me as well as make an impression on anyone else who sees them.

My vacation was exactly that – a vacation – so I didn’t want to turn the whole trip into a photography exercise.  However, I wanted to use my understanding of composition, aperture and other mechanics to bring home images that told a story and communicated how I felt when I took the shot.

The best example I have of this from my trip came from Prague.  Along the waterway, there are occasionally fences where lovers place locks for good luck.  The most popular one is very close to the John Lennon wall.  It is a really cool site, but the snapshot I took of it just doesn’t do it justice:

This is what a touristy snapshot looks like. It physically captured the scene, but isn’t visually very interesting and doesn’t really tell a story.  Shot at f/5.6, shutter 1/80.

Standing next to it, this scene is a lot more striking and cool than the above photo.  I really wanted to show off the brilliant colors and the diversity of the locks as well as create a sense of drama for the shot.  Here’s another view of the same scene:

Here the locks are the stars of the show. The composition and narrow depth of field create a much more dramatic perspective, and bring the colors to life. This was shot with the same 35mm lens, but shot at f/1.8 to create the thin zone of focus (focal plane) and composed to create drama and an opportunity for the creamy background (bokeh).  I manually chose the focus point for this shot, and tried several moving left to right down the frame to get the one I ultimately liked the most.

This shot speaks far more strongly to me as a memory of a cool place I visited, and it stands alone as an image, too.  All it took was a few seconds of thought about how best to tell the story of this place, select the best aperture for the job, compose the shot and shoot a few frames.  In this case, the “rule of thirds” applied more to the point of focus than the composition itself.

So often when I’m taking pictures, it is specifically about the pictures.  Whether it is photos of my children at a family event or outings specifically about creating images, my priority is photographs.  On vacation, only slivers of my attention were focused on the photography.  My main goal was to relax and enjoy two wonderful weeks with my wife.  A secondary goal was to bring back images as warm as my memories of the places and the experience.  Getting very comfortable with the hardware, theory and practice allowed me to do just that.

Has photography changed how you take vacation photos?  Did it help you enjoy your vacation more?  Anyone want to share a link to your favorite vacation photo?